Realty Vision


Posted by Realty Vision on 3/22/2018

Getting a mortgage is one of those things that everyone seems to have quite a bit of advice about. While people surely have good intentions, itís not always best to take the buying advice of everyone you meet. Below, youíll find the wrong kind of mortgage advice and why you should think twice about it. 


Pre-Approvals Are Pointless


Getting pre-approved for a mortgage can give you an upper hand when it comes to putting in offers on a home. Even though a pre-approval isnít a guarantee, itís a good step. It shows that youíre a serious buyer and locks you in with a lender so they can process your paperwork a bit more quickly when you do want to put an offer in on a home. 


Use Your Own Bank


While your own bank may be a good place to start when it comes to buying a home, you donít need to get your mortgage from the place where you already have an account. You need to compare rates at different banks to make sure youíre getting the best possible deal on a mortgage. Youíll also want to check on the mortgage requirements for each bank. Different banks have different standards based on down payment, credit scores and more. Youíll want to get your mortgage from the bank thatís right for you and your own situation. 


The Lowest Interest Rate Is Best


While this could be true, itís not set in stone. A bank with a slightly higher interest rate could offer you some benefits that you otherwise might not have. If you have a lower credit score, or less downpayment money, a bank offering a higher interest rate could be a better option for you. Low interest rates can have some fine print that might end up costing you a lot more in the long term. Do your research before you sign on with any kind of bank for your mortgage. 


Borrow The Maximum


Just because youíre approved for a certain amount of mortgage doesnít mean that you need to max out your budget. Itís always best to have a bit of a financial cushion for yourself to keep your budget from being extremely tight. When life throws you a curveball like unexpected medical bills or a job loss, youíll be glad that you didnít strain your budget to the end of your means. Even though the bigger, nicer house always looks more attractive, youíre better off financially if youíre sensible about the amount of money you borrow to buy a home.




Tags: mortgage rates   Mortgage   bank  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Realty Vision on 12/28/2017

If youíre in the market to buy a home, youíre probably learning many new vocabulary words. Pre-approved and pre-qualified are some buzz words that youíll need to know. Thereís a big difference in the two and how each can help you in the home buying process, so youíll want to educate yourself. With the proper preparation and knowledge, the home buying process will be much easier for you.  


Pre-Qualification


This is actually the initial step that you should take in the home buying process. Being pre-qualified allows your lender to get some key information from you. Make no mistake that getting pre-qualified is not the same thing as getting pre-approved.


The qualification process allows you to understand how much house youíll be able to afford. Your lender will look at your income, assets, and general financial picture. Thereís not a whole lot of information that your lender actually needs to get you pre-qualified. Many buyers make the mistake of interchanging the words qualified and approval. They think that once they have been pre-qualified, they have been approved for a certain amount as well. Since the pre-qualification process isnít as in-depth, you could be ďqualifiedĒ to buy a home that you actually canít afford once you dig a bit deeper into your financial situation. 


Being Pre-Approved


Getting pre-approved requires a bit more work on your part. Youíll need to provide your lender with a host of information including income statements, bank account statements, assets, and more. Your lender will take a look at your credit history and credit score. All of these numbers will go into a formula and help your lender determine a safe amount of money that youíll be able to borrow for a house. Things like your credit score and credit history will have an impact on the type of interest rate that youíll get for the home. The better your credit score, the better the interest rate will be that youíre offered. Being pre-approved will also be a big help to you when you decide to put an offer in on a home since youíll be seen as a buyer who is serious and dependable.  


Things To Think About


Although getting pre-qualified is fairly simple, itís a good step to take to understand your finances and the home buying process. Donít take the pre-qualification numbers as set in stone, just simply use them as a guide. 


Do some investigating on your own before you reach the pre-approval stage. Look at your income, debts, and expenses. See if there is anything that can be paid down before you take the leap to the next step. Check your credit report and be sure that there arenít any errors on the report that need to be remedied. Finally, look at your credit score and see if thereís anything that you can do better such as make more consistent on-time payments or pay down debt for a more desirable debt-to-income ratio.





Posted by Realty Vision on 8/10/2017

 

Two thirds of American homeowners are somewhere in the process of paying off a mortgage. It may seem like common sense that everyone should try to pay off their mortgage sooner rather than later. However, there are circumstances when it benefits a homeowner more to hold onto their mortgage longer.


In this article, weíll offer some tips on paying off your mortgage, when you should refinance, and offer some tools that will help you along the long road to debt-free homeownership. If youíre a homeowner and find yourself asking these questions, read on.

I can afford to pay more each month on my mortgage, but should I?

In many cases, paying off your home as quickly as possible saves you money in the long run. A shorter loan term means less interest applied to your loan which could save you thousands of dollars in accrued interest.


What many people donít think about is whether that money could be better spent elsewhere. If your mortgage interest rate isnít too high, you might be better off allocating that extra income toward investments or retirement funds where they could earn you more in the long run.


This technique is typically most beneficial for younger homeowners. In your 20s and 30s you stand the most to gain from long-term investments, especially tax-benefitted retirement funds. Ultimately youíll have to do the math, which is tricky because circumstances change; markets vary, our income goes up and down, etc. However, a good starting place is to determine whether you could earn more in retirement and investments than you could by paying off your mortgage sooner and therefore saving on interest. 

Iíve owned my home for a few years now, should I refinance?

Refinancing is a term that has become ubiquitous for homeowners. There are a few important things to understand about refinancing. First, lowering your monthly payments is not always ideal if it means youíll end up paying more interest in the long run. Ideally, refinancing your mortgage will help you pay the least amount in total.

One way this can be accomplished is by refinancing to a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage which often darry slightly lower interest rates. This option is designed for people who have improved their credit and increased their income since signing their first mortgage.

Math isnít my strong suit. How can I figure out my finances?

If all of the numbers and percentages associated with mortgages and refinancing seems overwhelming--youíre not alone. Fortunately, there are mortgage and refinancing calculators that will give you a good idea of where you stand if you decide to increase your payments or to attempt to refinance your loan. Here are some great tools:
  • Use this mortgage calculator for determining how much you would save by making extra payments.

  • This refinance calculator will help you understand the potential benefits of refinancing your mortgage.

  • To determine how much you could earn through investments (rather than paying more toward your mortgage) use this helpful tool.

  • You might be able to increase your savings by creating a better budget for yourself. This website will help you make a detailed budget and hold yourself accountable each month.






Tags: Mortgage   home   refinancing   finance  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Realty Vision on 6/1/2017

Your own gut may be a great check when buying a house. You know if a deal feels right for you or not. Partner with a licensed realtor who holds herself to the highest ethical standards and you may never have to worry about being part of a kickback or a mortgage fraud scheme. You may get the best prices on each part of the home buying and home owning process.

Empower yourself when buying a house

That includes getting the best deal on your closing costs, mortgage insurance rates, property appraisal costs, title fees, homeowner's insurance rates and mortgage fees. However, unless you live in the house that you buy with this realtor until you decide not to own a house anymore, benefits of working with the above the board realtor will run out.

To truly gain while buying a house, you need to trust yourself. You need to learn the ins and outs of the mortgage process. This doesn't mean that you need to know as much as a real estate with an active license. But, to protect yourself against mortgage fraud and other disadvantages, it does mean that you should know about mortgage elements like:

  • Real estate agent commissions and fees, including the average and competitive realtor commissions in areas that you are looking for a house in
  • Homeowner's association fees and costs that go to embezzlers (This can happen if homeowner's association board members aren't keeping a watchful eye on balance sheets, payments and bank records.)
  • Down payments (In addition to knowing what the average down payment percentage is, you should know how down payments will impact your monthly mortgage installments.)
  • Home inspection fees (Again, find out what the average rate for home inspection fees are in the area where you want to buy a house.)
  • Mortgage insurance costs (This costs is separate from homeowner's insurance.)
  • Insurance to protect your house and land, including financial protection against natural and human caused damages.
  • Fees associated with the mortgage application itself (Get clear about costs that you are responsible for paying that you won't be reimbursed.)
  • Values of houses in the area that you want to move into (It doesn't hurt to run comparables on houses in the area yourself.)

Know what you're getting into when buying a house

These additional costs may not be directly associated with buying a house, but they will impact your ability to make your monthly mortgage payments. At the top of the list are utility costs. Electricity and running water aren't the only utilities you may be responsible for after you buy a house. Other utility and home related costs include sewage and trash pickup fees.

After you buy a house, you may also be required to pay for gas, telephone services, oil,cable television and Internet services. You'll also have to pay to maintain your home. Maintenance costs cover repairing appliances like the refrigerator,washing machine or air conditioner.

Make sure that you can pay these costs comfortably before you take on the responsibility of owning a house. It can keep you from falling behind in your mortgage payments. It can help you to sleep good at night.




Tags: Mortgage   home buyer  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Realty Vision on 2/9/2017

Thereís numerous reasons why the name on a title to a home may not be the same as the name thatís on the mortgage loan. These reasons include:


  • Only one buyer had stable credit
  • Only one person was on the loan application
  • One person was released from the mortgage


No matter why this is the case, having your name on the mortgage but not on the title to a home can affect you and people residing in the home in different ways. 


Why Would Only One Name Be On The Mortgage?


If people are looking to get a home or refinance a home, but only one person has good credit a decision must be made. For the best possible mortgage rates, youíll want to person with the best credit to be the primary loan holder. This may mean that you need additional legal documents in the process.  


The person with lower credit may still be able to have their name placed on the title to the home. Anyone who plans to contribute financially to a home, even if not on the mortgage, should place their name on the title. This would be one instance when a name would be on the title to a home and not on the mortgage loan. In this case, a person has property rights, but no legal-financial responsibility to the home. Itís important to agree on the home arrangement that youíre considering. This would be done through a will or a legal contract. This way, all parties are protected in regards to the ownership of the home should something happen to the individual whose name is on the mortgage.


Legal Things To Consider


Those who are listed on the mortgage are the people who are responsible for house payments. If a personís name isnít on the mortgage, it doesnít release them from complete responsibility from the home. If your name is on the title to the home but not on the mortgage, the bank generally has first dibs on the home if thereís a lapse in payments. If you want to keep living in the house, youíll have to keep making payments on the home. If you canít make the mortgage payments, youíll risk going into foreclosure. 


Taxes


An issue that can come up if your name is not on the mortgage is that you cannot use the home youíre living in as a tax deduction. Even if you make payments on the home, in order for you to get tax benefits, your name must be on the mortgage stating that youíre legally responsible for the home. If you are paying for the mortgage because your name appears on the title to the home, you arenít legally entitled to pay, giving away your rights to tax benefits. If youíre married, filing jointly, and only one name appears on the mortgage, however, you can use this as a tax deduction. This becomes an issue if two unmarried people buy a home together.  


Ask For Legal Assistance


Whenever you have an issue with the title of your home or with names on the mortgage, itís good to consult legal counsel. The attorney can assist you in determining who is legally responsible for the home and if the people listed on the title of the home are correct. This can help save you from trouble at a future date.


Since credit scores and loans can get messy at times during the home buying process, itís good to understand all the implications of home mortgages and titles.




Tags: Buying a home   Mortgage  
Categories: Uncategorized  




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