Realty Vision


Posted by Realty Vision on 1/7/2016

More and more people today are recycling. In fact, about three-quarters of people in the U.S. recycle but most don't know how to properly recycle. Here are some great tips on how to be a smart recycler: 1. Remove the twist-off cap and ring from plastic bottles. The twist of off cap and ring are not recyclable. Bottles that arrive at recycling centers with the caps still on often are trashed. 2. Remove all food residues. Food waste adds impurities to products made from recycled materials, rendering them useless. So instead either clean out that pizza box or tear off the lid and any part of the box that’s clean, and recycle those. This also goes for paper towels and paper plates. 3. Rinse and repeat. Rinse out jars, bottles and other containers to remove food residue. It is also easier for the recycling center if you peel off any labels, along with as much of the sticky residue as you can. 4. Not all plastic is recyclable. There are many different types of plastics, look for the number inside the recycling symbol; the three arrows that form a triangle.  




Tags: recycle  
Categories: Help Around the House  


Posted by Realty Vision on 12/10/2015

There are many common household items that can be used to solve everyday problems. Everyday products can be used to remove stains, fix broken items and even clean the toilet! Here are just a few things you can find around the house to fix those everyday problems:

  • Use Kool Aid to clean dishwasher pipes. Just put in the detergent section and run a cycle, it will also clean a toilet.
  • Use peanut butter to remove scratches out of CD's. Wipe off with a coffee filter paper. Don't use chunky!
  • Pam cooking spray will also remove paint, and grease from your hands.
  • Coat goggles and glasses with Colgate toothpaste to keep them from fogging.
  • Coca Cola will remove grease stains from the driveway overnight. It is also know to remove corrosion from car batteries.
  • Morton salt has been proven to remove wine stains. Pour the salt onto the wine and watch it absorb into the salt.
  • Listerine can be used to clean that dirty grout.
  • Vinegar will take care of a case of heavy dandruff.
  • Karo Syrup is said to get out grass stains.
  • Do you have any common household remedies to share? If so, please share!





Posted by Realty Vision on 11/26/2015

Child-Proofing Your Home. Unintentional injury is one of the leading causes of death in children under 14. That should be enough to make any parent shudder. Child-proofing a new or existing home can be quite the headache, but it's an incredibly neccessary step in making sure your home is safe for all members of your family. Luckily, by following a simple checklist, you can rest easy knowing that you've covered most, if not all of your bases. While there are extra steps that may need to be taken on a house-by-house basis, most of these steps are applicable to just about every kind of residence. Smoke Detectors - While this may seem like an obvious step, you'd be surprised how many people don't follow through with their fire alert system. Low batteries, improper placement, and broken detectors can all spell potential tragedy for you and your family. Pay close attention to the manufacturer's instructions. You should have at least one smoke detector per level of your home, including the basement and attic. One very important step you can take these days is to purchase batteries that are designated for electronic devices. Carbon Monoxide Detectors - These need to be placed near sleeping areas, and at least 15 feet away from any fuel-burning appliances. Anti-Scalding Devices for your faucets - Contact your local plumber to get an estimate. Door Stops and Door Holders - If your home already comes equipped with these, then make sure they are all in good working order. Outlet Covers and Plates - Ensure that covers and plates aren't easily removable. Edge and Corner Bumpers - These come in a variety of styles, and are easily installed on the sharp edges and corners of your home. Pay special attention to the corners in your kitchen, as many child injuries take place here. Safety Latches and Locks - These need to be installed in cabinets that would be accessible at your child's level. These will prevent your child from gaining access to areas that hazardous cleaning materials are stored, like under your sinks. Doorknob Covers and Door Locks - Use these on rooms that aren't child-proofed. If you can prevent unsupervised access to a room, you don't have to worry about keeping it in perfect working order in regard to child proofing. Child Gates - Stair-related accidents can be avoided by implementing a gate system. Pay special attention to the types of gates used.....Pet gates are NOT the same product, and may lack the level of protection needed to ensure proper safety of your child. Childen are resourceful individuals, and can breach many systems that your family pets cannot.





Posted by Realty Vision on 11/19/2015

Today more and more people are worried about chemicals in their home and ways to save money. Making your own household cleaners  can be a great way to save money and know exactly what you are using in your home. Here are a few tips on how to make your own glass cleaner:   Ingredients: 2 tablespoons ammonia 1/2 cup alcohol 1/4 teaspoon dishwashing liquid A few drops blue food coloring water 1. Combine the ammonia, alcohol, dishwashing liquid, and food coloring, then add enough water to make 1 quart. If you prefer a nonammoniated cleaner, substitute 3 tablespoons vinegar or lemon juice for the ammonia. Here is another recipe: Ingredients: Water White Vinegar 1. Fill a spray bottle with equal parts vinegar and water. Use it as you would any other glass cleaner.    





Posted by Realty Vision on 11/12/2015

If you are looking for ways save money, cutting back on grocery expenses is often an easy way to reduce your spending. Here are ten tips to master frugal grocery shopping. A little planning can save you some big bucks over the long term. 1. Make a list. Before you head out to the store, prepare a list of everything you need, making sure you have everything needed for your weekly menu. Before you leave, check to make sure you don't have it in your pantry, fridge or freezer. Stick to that list and don't buy anything else. 2. Plan a menu. Plan a weekly menu for each week. This way you will know exactly what to buy. Be sure to plan a leftovers night. 3. Don't shop hungry. When you're hungry, everything looks good. When you shop hungry you'll end up spending a lot more. Eat first and then you will be able to stick to your list. 4. Set a budget. When you go to the store, know exactly how much you can spend. Then try your best to stick within that limit. Keep a running tally as you shop to ensure that you're within your budget. 5. Create a grocery spreadsheet. Keep your grocery receipts, then enter into a spreadsheet. This will be your price and comparison list. Use it so you know when bulk or sale items are a good deal. 6. Cook and freeze. Plan to cook a big amount of food and freeze it for multiple dinners. A great idea is to use one Sunday and cook a week's (or even a month's) worth of dinners. Plan 5-6 freezable dinners and cook them all at once. 7. Shop for specials. Every store has specials. Be sure to look for them in the newspaper, or when you get to the store. Don't buy things you don't use just because they are on sale; make sure you will use the items. 8. Buy store brands. Brand names are often no better than generic, and you're paying for all the advertising they do to have a brand name. Give the store brand a try, and often you won't notice a difference. 9. No "one-item" trips. They waste gas, and almost inevitably, you buy more than that one item. If you plan ahead, make a weekly menu, and shop with a list, this should drastically reduce the number of trips you make for a small number of items. 10. Stock up. Sale items can be a great deal. If it's an item you normally use, buy a bunch of them.







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